TOL Gatineau Communiqué

In early April 2010, members of the Gadabursi Community drew a line; making a clear departure from the traditional way of  fixing and plastering the cracks of the status quo to digging the root cause of the community’s ills and finding visionary and long-lasting solutions for them.  

Holding their first Tol Convocation on April 1-3, 2010 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, the conference attendees unanimously singled out failure of leadership as the fundamental cause of the Somali people’s economic underdevelopment, social disharmony and erosion of cultural values. Hence, they made “…launching the long process of reinvigorating the traditional leadership as well as imagining modernizing innovations…” as their urgent priority for their community in the Minneapolis communiqué. The Committee resulting from the Minnesota Tol Convocation held its first meeting in Ottawa, Canada, and issued the following communiqué:   

Gatineau Communiqué

The First Meeting of the Governing Board of the TOL Leadership Council, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada July 2nd - 4th, 2010.

(For Immediate Release)                                                                 

 

Maantaba malkaa inagu qummane, yaan la gees marine,  

Marka aanad hammon noloshu waa, mooyi dabadeede,  

Madhax ma laha aadmigu wuxuu, kuu mitamiyaaye,  

macaluul wax kaagama taraan, maal laguu guraye,  

midigtaadu waxay xoogsataa, maydha kaa jara e,

                      (Abdillahi Suldaan Maxamed, Timacadde, 1971)

 

 

The concept of TOL acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following: optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace, social justice and generosity (Prof. Ahmed Samatar, 2010)

 

 

In the mighty vortex of history, which inevitably crushes all peoples that are not as hard and as flexible as steel, such a community couldn’t permanently maintain itself (Theodore Mommsen, 1908)    

Without overlooking the discernable variability in the condition of the Somali people, these are, indeed, dark times for the majority.  All indictors of the major spheres of existence, from environmental, economic, cultural, political, to personal security, point to the buildup of vulnerabilities, best captured by this alarming fact: nearly half of the population is now considered to suffer from notable degrees of malnourishment.

 The general state of affairs notwithstanding, we are convinced that some zones are more brittle than others.  One such example is the Gadabursi community – inhabitants of a large swath of territory in the Horn of Africa.  While specific members of this community have found notable successes in their respective endeavors, we hold that these individual accomplishments do not add up to the progress of collective well-being. In fact, a strong argument can be made to the contrary:  communal survival, let alone advancement, is in new danger.  To be sure, the threats emanate from a variety of sources, whose clear identification, detailed analyses, and judicious prioritization are waiting to be undertaken. What is certain is this:  there is a growing consensus that the most immediate challenge to the community, and key to any collective efficacy in the face of the mounting menace, is the question of effective and inclusive leadership – one that combines the best of the community’s traditions and talents in imagining a new, galvanizing and enabling vision delivered and pursued with uncommon ability, courage, and rectitude

Here, it is necessary to make clear the nature of the group’s affinity. The conviction behind this initiative distinguishes between an affiliation based on tribal mentality/clanism and kinship. Describing the difference between the two in his opening speech at the Minnesota Tol Convocation, Professor Ahmed I. Samatar said:

“The first (clanship), connotes what Somalis would call Qabiil and, thus, is motivated by small-mindedness and the ‘Othering’ of those who don’t belong to the assumed genealogical tree; the latter is grounded on the concept of Tol that acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following:  optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace,  social justice and generosity.

“In short, Qabiil is always negative, if not degenerative, and lends itself to internal fissures and hate for the non-member. TOL, on the other hand, is conducive to group solidarity linked to deep empathy for strangers. We believe such a perspective transforms the way many contemporary Somalis relate to each other and, thus, bodes well for engagements that enrich constructive pluralism.”

This first meeting of the TOL Committee follows on the footsteps of the Minnesota convocation earlier this year where a cohort of scholars, professionals, and civic leaders were elected. This meeting moved the ball further by creating a formal structure to this important TOL initiative, defining its vision and mission. Here is a summary of the proceedings of the TOL Committee meeting in Gatineau, Canada:  

COMMUNIQUE

Whereas:

1-       The first TOL Committee meeting held in Gatineau, Canada, on July 2-4, 2010 aimed at advancing the ideas and insights gained at the TOL Convocation held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA in April 2010.

2-      The Gatineau-Ottawa coordinating group put together a memorable event with outstanding meeting facilities, exquisite food, and convivial ambience to welcome their TOL brothers and sisters to their city.

3-      The TOL committee conducted a vigorous debate and deliberated on the vision, mission, and bylaws of the new TOL Committee.

4-      The attending TOL Committee members appreciated and enjoyed the gathering of the Ottawa TOL held on the last day, July 4, 2010 where frank and friendly exchange of ideas with the larger community were conducted, culminating in a pleasing cultural entertainment in the evening at the beautiful Chateau Cartier Hotel and Conference Center, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada.

5-       We are committed to the vision of a TOL in the Horn of Africa and around the world that is united; prosperous; at peace with itself, its neighbors and its natural environment; and able to advance and safeguard the common social, economic, property and human rights of its people.

6-      We recognize and affirm the imperative of promoting unity among the component constituents of the TOL for the common good.

7-      We recognize, respect, and affirm the rights and responsibilities to neighboring communities with whom we share common spatial habitat and whose destinies are deeply intertwined with that of our TOL.

8-      We are committed to establishing a bridging mechanism which is capable of facilitating the smooth merger of the wisdoms of the traditional leadership with the dynamism of modernity.

9-      We recognize the need to engage the TOL globally in its various settings to harvest the market place of ideas and generate insights; undertake an in-depth analysis of the nature and magnitude of the major challenges facing the TOL; and establish a road map for the attainment of the Council’s vision.

The TOL Committee passed the following resolutions:

1)      The name of the TOL Committee shall be the TOL Leadership Council (TLC)

2)      The structure of the TOL Leadership Council was discussed and the bylaws were formulated, debated and adopted.

3)      The Governing Board was  expanded to a total of 30 members, with Ugas  Abdirashid Ugas Roble as  honorary member

4)      An Executive Committee of 10 members was elected as the first Executive Officers of the TOL Leadership Council.

5)      The Governing Board agreed that a grand TOL Convention be held at an appropriate location back in the region as soon as feasible.  

6)      The Governing Board agreed to send the first TLC delegation, consisting of three members, to the TOL-inhabited areas of the region to assess the state of the TOL community, hold community conversations with the TOL traditional leadership as well as the community at large, and gather ideas and insights. They will also lay some of the groundwork for the Grand TOL Convention

List of the Executive Committee Members:

1)      Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar, Chair

2)      Yusuf Aden Qalib, Vice Chair

3)      Abdiwahid Sh.Osman, Vice Chair

4)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile, Secretary

5)      Rhoda Haji Mizan, Treasurer

6)      Bashir Sh. Omar Goth, Director of Communications

7)      Abdi Dahir Aye, Webmaster

8)      Professor Hussein Warsame, Convener of the Education, Culture, and Training Committee

9)      Professor Mohamed Farah Good, Convener of the Resources and Planning Committee

10)  Dr. Ali Bahar, Convener of the Diaspora Relations Committee

 

List of the Expanded Governing Board:

1)      Ebado Hussein ( Ontario , Canada )

2)      Mohamed Farah ( Alberta , Canada )

3)      Dr Ali Ibrahim Bahar (Texas, USA )

4)      Eng. Rashid Cige Guled (Illinois, USA )

5)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile (Texas, USA )

6)      Halimo Hassan Saad ( Ontario , Canada )

7)      Dr Abdirahman Beileh ( Tunis , Tunisia )

8)      AbdulWahid Sheikh Osman Qalinle (Minnesota , USA )

9)  Professor Hussein Ahmed Warsame ( Alberta , Canada )

10)  Prof. Mohamed Farah Good (Wardi)(Massachusetts, USA )

11)  Safia Abdillahi Ismael (Texas, USA )

12)  Halimo Jama Hadi (Texas, USA )

13)  Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar (Minnesota , USA )

14)  Mubarak Ahmed Nur ( Illinois , USA )

15)  Bashir Sh Omar Goth ( Abu Dhabi , UAE)

16)  Yusuf Adan Qalib (Texas, USA )

17)  Roda Haji Ahmed Mizan (Texas, USA)

18)  Abdi Dahir Aye (Texas, USA )

19)  Lul Ahmed Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

20)  Abdulkadir Ismail Jama (Minnesota, USA)

21)  Abubakar Hamud Jibril (Minnesota, USA)

22)  Jama Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

23) Hassan Aden (Ottawa, Canada)

24) Hassan Musa Khalif (London)

25) Abdirahman Dahir (London)

26) Dr. Elmi Nur (Sweden)

27) Dr. Yaqub Aden (Sweden)

28) Abdillahi Osman (Australia)

29) Vacant (to be filled soon)

30) Vacant (to be filled soon).

For further information you can write to:

Bashir Goth, email: bgoth@yahoo.com

Abdi Aye, email: abdiatom@gmail.com

Lul Osman, email: ravenclewis@hotmail.com

In early April 2010, members of the Gadabursi Community drew a line; making a clear departure from the traditional way of  fixing and plastering the cracks of the status quo to digging the root cause of the community’s ills and finding visionary and long-lasting solutions for them.  

Holding their first Tol Convocation on April 1-3, 2010 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, the conference attendees unanimously singled out failure of leadership as the fundamental cause of the Somali people’s economic underdevelopment, social disharmony and erosion of cultural values. Hence, they made “…launching the long process of reinvigorating the traditional leadership as well as imagining modernizing innovations…” as their urgent priority for their community in the Minneapolis communiqué. The Committee resulting from the Minnesota Tol Convocation held its first meeting in Ottawa, Canada, and issued the following communiqué:   

Gatineau Communiqué

The First Meeting of the Governing Board of the TOL Leadership Council, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada July 2nd - 4th, 2010.

(For Immediate Release)                                                                 

 

Maantaba malkaa inagu qummane, yaan la gees marine,  

Marka aanad hammon noloshu waa, mooyi dabadeede,  

Madhax ma laha aadmigu wuxuu, kuu mitamiyaaye,  

macaluul wax kaagama taraan, maal laguu guraye,  

midigtaadu waxay xoogsataa, maydha kaa jara e,

                      (Abdillahi Suldaan Maxamed, Timacadde, 1971)

 

 

The concept of TOL acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following: optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace, social justice and generosity (Prof. Ahmed Samatar, 2010)

 

 

In the mighty vortex of history, which inevitably crushes all peoples that are not as hard and as flexible as steel, such a community couldn’t permanently maintain itself (Theodore Mommsen, 1908)    

Without overlooking the discernable variability in the condition of the Somali people, these are, indeed, dark times for the majority.  All indictors of the major spheres of existence, from environmental, economic, cultural, political, to personal security, point to the buildup of vulnerabilities, best captured by this alarming fact: nearly half of the population is now considered to suffer from notable degrees of malnourishment.

 The general state of affairs notwithstanding, we are convinced that some zones are more brittle than others.  One such example is the Gadabursi community – inhabitants of a large swath of territory in the Horn of Africa.  While specific members of this community have found notable successes in their respective endeavors, we hold that these individual accomplishments do not add up to the progress of collective well-being. In fact, a strong argument can be made to the contrary:  communal survival, let alone advancement, is in new danger.  To be sure, the threats emanate from a variety of sources, whose clear identification, detailed analyses, and judicious prioritization are waiting to be undertaken. What is certain is this:  there is a growing consensus that the most immediate challenge to the community, and key to any collective efficacy in the face of the mounting menace, is the question of effective and inclusive leadership – one that combines the best of the community’s traditions and talents in imagining a new, galvanizing and enabling vision delivered and pursued with uncommon ability, courage, and rectitude

Here, it is necessary to make clear the nature of the group’s affinity. The conviction behind this initiative distinguishes between an affiliation based on tribal mentality/clanism and kinship. Describing the difference between the two in his opening speech at the Minnesota Tol Convocation, Professor Ahmed I. Samatar said:

“The first (clanship), connotes what Somalis would call Qabiil and, thus, is motivated by small-mindedness and the ‘Othering’ of those who don’t belong to the assumed genealogical tree; the latter is grounded on the concept of Tol that acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following:  optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace,  social justice and generosity.

“In short, Qabiil is always negative, if not degenerative, and lends itself to internal fissures and hate for the non-member. TOL, on the other hand, is conducive to group solidarity linked to deep empathy for strangers. We believe such a perspective transforms the way many contemporary Somalis relate to each other and, thus, bodes well for engagements that enrich constructive pluralism.”

This first meeting of the TOL Committee follows on the footsteps of the Minnesota convocation earlier this year where a cohort of scholars, professionals, and civic leaders were elected. This meeting moved the ball further by creating a formal structure to this important TOL initiative, defining its vision and mission. Here is a summary of the proceedings of the TOL Committee meeting in Gatineau, Canada:  

COMMUNIQUE

Whereas:

1-       The first TOL Committee meeting held in Gatineau, Canada, on July 2-4, 2010 aimed at advancing the ideas and insights gained at the TOL Convocation held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA in April 2010.

2-      The Gatineau-Ottawa coordinating group put together a memorable event with outstanding meeting facilities, exquisite food, and convivial ambience to welcome their TOL brothers and sisters to their city.

3-      The TOL committee conducted a vigorous debate and deliberated on the vision, mission, and bylaws of the new TOL Committee.

4-      The attending TOL Committee members appreciated and enjoyed the gathering of the Ottawa TOL held on the last day, July 4, 2010 where frank and friendly exchange of ideas with the larger community were conducted, culminating in a pleasing cultural entertainment in the evening at the beautiful Chateau Cartier Hotel and Conference Center, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada.

5-       We are committed to the vision of a TOL in the Horn of Africa and around the world that is united; prosperous; at peace with itself, its neighbors and its natural environment; and able to advance and safeguard the common social, economic, property and human rights of its people.

6-      We recognize and affirm the imperative of promoting unity among the component constituents of the TOL for the common good.

7-      We recognize, respect, and affirm the rights and responsibilities to neighboring communities with whom we share common spatial habitat and whose destinies are deeply intertwined with that of our TOL.

8-      We are committed to establishing a bridging mechanism which is capable of facilitating the smooth merger of the wisdoms of the traditional leadership with the dynamism of modernity.

9-      We recognize the need to engage the TOL globally in its various settings to harvest the market place of ideas and generate insights; undertake an in-depth analysis of the nature and magnitude of the major challenges facing the TOL; and establish a road map for the attainment of the Council’s vision.

The TOL Committee passed the following resolutions:

1)      The name of the TOL Committee shall be the TOL Leadership Council (TLC)

2)      The structure of the TOL Leadership Council was discussed and the bylaws were formulated, debated and adopted.

3)      The Governing Board was  expanded to a total of 30 members, with Ugas  Abdirashid Ugas Roble as  honorary member

4)      An Executive Committee of 10 members was elected as the first Executive Officers of the TOL Leadership Council.

5)      The Governing Board agreed that a grand TOL Convention be held at an appropriate location back in the region as soon as feasible.  

6)      The Governing Board agreed to send the first TLC delegation, consisting of three members, to the TOL-inhabited areas of the region to assess the state of the TOL community, hold community conversations with the TOL traditional leadership as well as the community at large, and gather ideas and insights. They will also lay some of the groundwork for the Grand TOL Convention

List of the Executive Committee Members:

1)      Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar, Chair

2)      Yusuf Aden Qalib, Vice Chair

3)      Abdiwahid Sh.Osman, Vice Chair

4)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile, Secretary

5)      Rhoda Haji Mizan, Treasurer

6)      Bashir Sh. Omar Goth, Director of Communications

7)      Abdi Dahir Aye, Webmaster

8)      Professor Hussein Warsame, Convener of the Education, Culture, and Training Committee

9)      Professor Mohamed Farah Good, Convener of the Resources and Planning Committee

10)  Dr. Ali Bahar, Convener of the Diaspora Relations Committee

 

List of the Expanded Governing Board:

1)      Ebado Hussein ( Ontario , Canada )

2)      Mohamed Farah ( Alberta , Canada )

3)      Dr Ali Ibrahim Bahar (Texas, USA )

4)      Eng. Rashid Cige Guled (Illinois, USA )

5)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile (Texas, USA )

6)      Halimo Hassan Saad ( Ontario , Canada )

7)      Dr Abdirahman Beileh ( Tunis , Tunisia )

8)      AbdulWahid Sheikh Osman Qalinle (Minnesota , USA )

9)  Professor Hussein Ahmed Warsame ( Alberta , Canada )

10)  Prof. Mohamed Farah Good (Wardi)(Massachusetts, USA )

11)  Safia Abdillahi Ismael (Texas, USA )

12)  Halimo Jama Hadi (Texas, USA )

13)  Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar (Minnesota , USA )

14)  Mubarak Ahmed Nur ( Illinois , USA )

15)  Bashir Sh Omar Goth ( Abu Dhabi , UAE)

16)  Yusuf Adan Qalib (Texas, USA )

17)  Roda Haji Ahmed Mizan (Texas, USA)

18)  Abdi Dahir Aye (Texas, USA )

19)  Lul Ahmed Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

20)  Abdulkadir Ismail Jama (Minnesota, USA)

21)  Abubakar Hamud Jibril (Minnesota, USA)

22)  Jama Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

23) Hassan Aden (Ottawa, Canada)

24) Hassan Musa Khalif (London)

25) Abdirahman Dahir (London)

26) Dr. Elmi Nur (Sweden)

27) Dr. Yaqub Aden (Sweden)

28) Abdillahi Osman (Australia)

29) Vacant (to be filled soon)

30) Vacant (to be filled soon).

For further information you can write to:

Bashir Goth, email: bgoth@yahoo.com

Abdi Aye, email: abdiatom@gmail.com

Lul Osman, email: ravenclewis@hotmail.com

In early April 2010, members of the Gadabursi Community drew a line; making a clear departure from the traditional way of  fixing and plastering the cracks of the status quo to digging the root cause of the community’s ills and finding visionary and long-lasting solutions for them.  

Holding their first Tol Convocation on April 1-3, 2010 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, the conference attendees unanimously singled out failure of leadership as the fundamental cause of the Somali people’s economic underdevelopment, social disharmony and erosion of cultural values. Hence, they made “…launching the long process of reinvigorating the traditional leadership as well as imagining modernizing innovations…” as their urgent priority for their community in the Minneapolis communiqué. The Committee resulting from the Minnesota Tol Convocation held its first meeting in Ottawa, Canada, and issued the following communiqué:   

Gatineau Communiqué

The First Meeting of the Governing Board of the TOL Leadership Council, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada July 2nd - 4th, 2010.

(For Immediate Release)                                                                 

 

Maantaba malkaa inagu qummane, yaan la gees marine,  

Marka aanad hammon noloshu waa, mooyi dabadeede,  

Madhax ma laha aadmigu wuxuu, kuu mitamiyaaye,  

macaluul wax kaagama taraan, maal laguu guraye,  

midigtaadu waxay xoogsataa, maydha kaa jara e,

                      (Abdillahi Suldaan Maxamed, Timacadde, 1971)

 

 

The concept of TOL acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following: optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace, social justice and generosity (Prof. Ahmed Samatar, 2010)

 

 

In the mighty vortex of history, which inevitably crushes all peoples that are not as hard and as flexible as steel, such a community couldn’t permanently maintain itself (Theodore Mommsen, 1908)    

Without overlooking the discernable variability in the condition of the Somali people, these are, indeed, dark times for the majority.  All indictors of the major spheres of existence, from environmental, economic, cultural, political, to personal security, point to the buildup of vulnerabilities, best captured by this alarming fact: nearly half of the population is now considered to suffer from notable degrees of malnourishment.

 The general state of affairs notwithstanding, we are convinced that some zones are more brittle than others.  One such example is the Gadabursi community – inhabitants of a large swath of territory in the Horn of Africa.  While specific members of this community have found notable successes in their respective endeavors, we hold that these individual accomplishments do not add up to the progress of collective well-being. In fact, a strong argument can be made to the contrary:  communal survival, let alone advancement, is in new danger.  To be sure, the threats emanate from a variety of sources, whose clear identification, detailed analyses, and judicious prioritization are waiting to be undertaken. What is certain is this:  there is a growing consensus that the most immediate challenge to the community, and key to any collective efficacy in the face of the mounting menace, is the question of effective and inclusive leadership – one that combines the best of the community’s traditions and talents in imagining a new, galvanizing and enabling vision delivered and pursued with uncommon ability, courage, and rectitude

Here, it is necessary to make clear the nature of the group’s affinity. The conviction behind this initiative distinguishes between an affiliation based on tribal mentality/clanism and kinship. Describing the difference between the two in his opening speech at the Minnesota Tol Convocation, Professor Ahmed I. Samatar said:

“The first (clanship), connotes what Somalis would call Qabiil and, thus, is motivated by small-mindedness and the ‘Othering’ of those who don’t belong to the assumed genealogical tree; the latter is grounded on the concept of Tol that acknowledges primordial ties but, more importantly, stresses the following:  optimum protection of individual and communal welfare, and meeting of obligations to other communities (from the intimate neighbor to the most geographically distant of the Somali people) in a larger context of peace,  social justice and generosity.

“In short, Qabiil is always negative, if not degenerative, and lends itself to internal fissures and hate for the non-member. TOL, on the other hand, is conducive to group solidarity linked to deep empathy for strangers. We believe such a perspective transforms the way many contemporary Somalis relate to each other and, thus, bodes well for engagements that enrich constructive pluralism.”

This first meeting of the TOL Committee follows on the footsteps of the Minnesota convocation earlier this year where a cohort of scholars, professionals, and civic leaders were elected. This meeting moved the ball further by creating a formal structure to this important TOL initiative, defining its vision and mission. Here is a summary of the proceedings of the TOL Committee meeting in Gatineau, Canada:  

COMMUNIQUE

Whereas:

1-       The first TOL Committee meeting held in Gatineau, Canada, on July 2-4, 2010 aimed at advancing the ideas and insights gained at the TOL Convocation held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA in April 2010.

2-      The Gatineau-Ottawa coordinating group put together a memorable event with outstanding meeting facilities, exquisite food, and convivial ambience to welcome their TOL brothers and sisters to their city.

3-      The TOL committee conducted a vigorous debate and deliberated on the vision, mission, and bylaws of the new TOL Committee.

4-      The attending TOL Committee members appreciated and enjoyed the gathering of the Ottawa TOL held on the last day, July 4, 2010 where frank and friendly exchange of ideas with the larger community were conducted, culminating in a pleasing cultural entertainment in the evening at the beautiful Chateau Cartier Hotel and Conference Center, Gatineau, Quebec, Canada.

5-       We are committed to the vision of a TOL in the Horn of Africa and around the world that is united; prosperous; at peace with itself, its neighbors and its natural environment; and able to advance and safeguard the common social, economic, property and human rights of its people.

6-      We recognize and affirm the imperative of promoting unity among the component constituents of the TOL for the common good.

7-      We recognize, respect, and affirm the rights and responsibilities to neighboring communities with whom we share common spatial habitat and whose destinies are deeply intertwined with that of our TOL.

8-      We are committed to establishing a bridging mechanism which is capable of facilitating the smooth merger of the wisdoms of the traditional leadership with the dynamism of modernity.

9-      We recognize the need to engage the TOL globally in its various settings to harvest the market place of ideas and generate insights; undertake an in-depth analysis of the nature and magnitude of the major challenges facing the TOL; and establish a road map for the attainment of the Council’s vision.

The TOL Committee passed the following resolutions:

1)      The name of the TOL Committee shall be the TOL Leadership Council (TLC)

2)      The structure of the TOL Leadership Council was discussed and the bylaws were formulated, debated and adopted.

3)      The Governing Board was  expanded to a total of 30 members, with Ugas  Abdirashid Ugas Roble as  honorary member

4)      An Executive Committee of 10 members was elected as the first Executive Officers of the TOL Leadership Council.

5)      The Governing Board agreed that a grand TOL Convention be held at an appropriate location back in the region as soon as feasible.  

6)      The Governing Board agreed to send the first TLC delegation, consisting of three members, to the TOL-inhabited areas of the region to assess the state of the TOL community, hold community conversations with the TOL traditional leadership as well as the community at large, and gather ideas and insights. They will also lay some of the groundwork for the Grand TOL Convention

List of the Executive Committee Members:

1)      Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar, Chair

2)      Yusuf Aden Qalib, Vice Chair

3)      Abdiwahid Sh.Osman, Vice Chair

4)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile, Secretary

5)      Rhoda Haji Mizan, Treasurer

6)      Bashir Sh. Omar Goth, Director of Communications

7)      Abdi Dahir Aye, Webmaster

8)      Professor Hussein Warsame, Convener of the Education, Culture, and Training Committee

9)      Professor Mohamed Farah Good, Convener of the Resources and Planning Committee

10)  Dr. Ali Bahar, Convener of the Diaspora Relations Committee

 

List of the Expanded Governing Board:

1)      Ebado Hussein ( Ontario , Canada )

2)      Mohamed Farah ( Alberta , Canada )

3)      Dr Ali Ibrahim Bahar (Texas, USA )

4)      Eng. Rashid Cige Guled (Illinois, USA )

5)      Dr. Hodan Muse Rabile (Texas, USA )

6)      Halimo Hassan Saad ( Ontario , Canada )

7)      Dr Abdirahman Beileh ( Tunis , Tunisia )

8)      AbdulWahid Sheikh Osman Qalinle (Minnesota , USA )

9)  Professor Hussein Ahmed Warsame ( Alberta , Canada )

10)  Prof. Mohamed Farah Good (Wardi)(Massachusetts, USA )

11)  Safia Abdillahi Ismael (Texas, USA )

12)  Halimo Jama Hadi (Texas, USA )

13)  Professor Ahmed Ismail Samatar (Minnesota , USA )

14)  Mubarak Ahmed Nur ( Illinois , USA )

15)  Bashir Sh Omar Goth ( Abu Dhabi , UAE)

16)  Yusuf Adan Qalib (Texas, USA )

17)  Roda Haji Ahmed Mizan (Texas, USA)

18)  Abdi Dahir Aye (Texas, USA )

19)  Lul Ahmed Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

20)  Abdulkadir Ismail Jama (Minnesota, USA)

21)  Abubakar Hamud Jibril (Minnesota, USA)

22)  Jama Osman ( Ontario , Canada )

23) Hassan Aden (Ottawa, Canada)

24) Hassan Musa Khalif (London)

25) Abdirahman Dahir (London)

26) Dr. Elmi Nur (Sweden)

27) Dr. Yaqub Aden (Sweden)

28) Abdillahi Osman (Australia)

29) Vacant (to be filled soon)

30) Vacant (to be filled soon).

For further information you can write to:

Bashir Goth, email: bgoth@yahoo.com

Abdi Aye, email: abdiatom@gmail.com

Lul Osman, email: ravenclewis@hotmail.com

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